Explore above and below sea level while sailing in Greece

You can enjoy snorkelling as part of any holiday spent sailing in Greece as the area is renowned for its crystal clear waters, high visibility, warm seas and great variety of sea plants and fish. Visibility can be more than 30 metres in summer and rocky seabeds make for the greatest selection of colourful sea life.

To make the most of these great snorkelling conditions, follow a few simple rules to ensure you have the most fun possible and stay safe at the same time.

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Choose quiet times

The best time to go snorkelling is either early in the day or an hour or two before before the sun sets. The quieter the time, the better. If you can, avoid any crowds on nearby beaches and in the sea since there is less chance of the fish being frightened away by noise and movement, giving you the chance of seeing as many of the spectacular species that live in the area as possible.

The minimum of movement

When snorkelling, always try to move as slowly as you can and make as little noise as possible. Do not move your hands unless you really have to and if there are still not many fish around, simply stand still if you can. Fish are curious by nature and are likely to come out to investigate if they do not sense a threat. One of the best tips is to take along a bag of food – the oilier and smellier the better. Throw in a little at a time and you will soon have fish swimming all around.

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Stay safe

Keep an eye out for sea urchins and scorpion fish on rocks and for weevers who like to live in mud or sand at the bottom of the sea. The spines of the poisonous weever and scorpion fish can give you a nasty sting, causing intense pain and swelling. If you do get stung, clean the area properly, stick on a plaster and pop to see a doctor. Make sure you have your European Health Insurance Card with you. Wear flippers or jelly shoes to minimise the chances of being stung. And don’t play with the local Moray eels as they can bite.

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